Isotonik Studios Max for Live Generative Sequencers Arcade Series Returns

I’m a huge fan of Isotonik Studio’s work so I was happy to see The Arcade Series Returns. I’ll hopefully have time to dig into these sequencers soon – so for now, I’m spreading the word on a what looks to be a very cool set of Max for Live devices.

The Arcade Series Returns is a set of four MaxforLive Generative Sequencers based on Classic Arcade Games, plug in your controller (with support for Push 1 & 2, LaunchPad & Maschine JAM) and get creative…

Consisting of four MaxforLive generative sequencers, the Arcade Series Returns can help defeat writers block or be the beginning of that inspirational piece of music. Each device is fully compatible and controllable with 8×8 grid based controllers Push 1, Push 2, Launchpad MINI, MK1, MK2 & PRO and the Native Instruments Maschine Jam.

Check out this intro video. More details and videos here https://isotonikstudios.com/product/arcade-series-returns/.

Mark Mosher
Synthesist, Producer, Composer, Improvisational Musician & Visualist
Founder Modulate This! Blog & The Rocky Mountain Synthesizer Meetup
http://www.MarkMosherMusic.com
http://www.ModulateThis.com
http://www.RockyMountainSynth.com

Ableton Acquires Cycling ’74

A photo I took earlier today while using Ableton Live and Max for Live (MultimapperXBOX360 + a custom device I made) to map an Xbox 360 Wireless Bluetooth Controller to controller to Mod, Pressure, Aftertouch, and Breath Controller signals to U-HE Hive.

It was announced today Ableton Acquired Cycling ’74. Congrats to all my friends at both companies!

As someone who uses Ableton Live and Max for Live on a daily basis I’m pretty excited to see where this acquisition takes both products. Even as two separate companies, the combination of Live and Max for Live have been transformative for my workflow and art. I use community devices, Cycling ’74 devices, Ableton devices, 3rd party commercial devices and sometimes even make my own simple MIDI processing utility apps to solve unique problems in my rig.

The big win though is Max for Live’s ability to target parameters with any other device turns all of Live (and any other M4L and VSTs) into a massive modular platform.  I can only imagine the acquisition will lead tighter integration, higher performance, and an even more rapid workflow for creating custom devices.

As a light-weight user of full-on Max, I’m also excited to see how the two companies will come together to extend and evolve the full version of Max and make it even easier to move code back-and-forth Live hosted and native Max. The future looks even brighter for Live and Cycling ’74 users.

Links:

Watch This Cool Tutorial on How to Make Pink Floyd “On The Run” with M4L OSCiLOTT Modular

 

I’ve had Max for Cats OSCiLOTT Max for Live Modular for some time but only recently had time to start digging into it. I’ve been poking around on YouTube watching tutorial videos on the instrument and bumped into this fantastic demo of how to make Pink Floyd’s “On the Run” in 10 Minutes. The demo also shows off how great OSCiLLOT sounds.

The video is by Gattobus (check out his YouTube channel here).

This is a tutorial I prepared for my students during the synth course in RockFactory music school in Siena (Italy) I used Ableton Live 9 with M4L plugin OSCiLLOT by Max for Cats. “On the run” is a classic piece of electronic music that I like very much to cover every now and then… so: here it is, again! 😛

You can use this tutorial to get an idea on how this piece is done and try to apply the basics to every kind of synthesizer you might have.

Wireless Controllerism on Windows 10 with Microsoft’s Xbox One Wireless “S” Bluetooth Game Controller

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If you’ve been following along, you know I’ve been experimenting with the Microsoft Surface Pro 4 as a musical instrument platform for Live, Max for Live and virtual modular. I’ve also been working towards a completely wireless battery operated setup for a rapid setup rig for live improvisational work including wireless expressive controllers. Another advantage of wireless means you can use the same system on the couch without accidently snapping off a cable or stressing a port.

Controllerism with a Game Controller

I’ve been using wired joysticks on-and-off for a year or so. One interesting thing about using an Xbox (or PlayStation controller) as an expressive controller is that the design affordances are as well understood and obvious as the pedals of a car.

This means:

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