Junea – New Album by Electronic Music Artist and Thereminst May Roosevelt

may-roosevelt-Junea

Spreading the word about this terrific release by May Roosevelt. Enjoy!

“May Roosevelt marks her return in 2017 with her new album titled «Junea», coming out on October 23rd via Inner Ear.

Junea is a heroine of the modern digital world, where reality meets fiction through bridges made of electronic sounds and pixels. Musically, it could be said that she is an alter ego of May Roosevelt, adding new qualities to the artist’s existing musical identity.

In the world of Junea synthesizers rule, creating a multi-layered sound environment of crystal sounds and rhythmic beats. Ethereal vocals and encrypted lyrics lead to a parallel dreamy, three-dimensional universe that mirrors the artist’s exploration into new musical coordinates.”

may-roosevelt-vinyl

More info at http://mayroosevelt.com/.

New Electronic Music Release – Total Squaresville by Pattern Language

I’m spreading the word about a new release Total Squareseville by my good friend Chris Frain (aka Pattern Language). Chris has been a regular contributor to the electronic music scene in Boulder and Denver since he moved to Denver a few years back, and a regular at the Rocky Mountain Synthesizer Meetup where he’s presented and performed.  He also made the list of  “Twelve of Colorado’s Greatest Synthesizer Artists” by Westword Magazine.

Total Squaresville is available on Bandcamp, iTunes, on other digital outlets and as a physical CD

It’s a fantastic release and Chris is getting some well-deserved buzz so give it a listen and consider a buy to support the art. Here is some coverage as noted by his label the UK-based Happy Robot Records

Highlights of coverage for ‘Total Squaresville’ includes radio play from Steve Lamacq and Gideon Coe on BBC 6Music, spins on Resonance FM, on Artefaktor Radio thanks to Rusty Egan plus with significant play on other stations with the album charting on college stations in the States. The record has also had some great reviews and features from the likes of Spill Magazine, Overblown MagazineThe Electricity Club, The Joy of Violent Movement and Westword Magazine.

Videos

Here are a few videos in support of the release. This first one is my favorite track off the album.

PATTERN LANGUAGE: Le Choc des Etoiles

PATTERN LANGUAGE: By Time We Get There 

Liner Notes

Pattern Language is the new project of Chris Frain who debuts on Happy Robots Records with the “Total Squaresville” mini-album.

Based in Boulder, Colorado, Chris dabbled in indie-pop and prog-rock bands until a chance viewing of the BBC4 documentary, “Synth Britannia” that lead to his falling back in love with his first love, the sound of the synthesizer.

The six instrumental tracks on ‘Total Squaresville’, as well as being inspired by the likes of Kraftwerk, Cluster, Harmonia, La Dusseldorf, also draw heavily on influences from Chris’ childhood, including The Art of Noise, Eurythmics, Thomas Dolby, and the 1980s iteration of King Crimson. Of particular note is the use of pre-Roland 808 sounds for the drum machine parts, placing this version of synthwave closer to the late 1970s than the mid-to-late 1980s sound. Not only does this release feature simple, infectious melodies and motorik-beat rhythms, but with its splatering of Melotron strings and and bongo-heavy percussion. While almost unheard of in popular electronic music, “The Castellers” glides along in 3/4 waltz time replete with flamenco hand-claps. Electro and space disco-inspired “A Pattern Language,” along the moody minimalist piece “Deeply Recessed Windows,” round out the tracklist on this debut release.

‘Total Squaresville’ follows two brilliant remixes that Chris produced for Rodney Cromwell, the remix of Baby Robot was described by Louder Than War as “Replete with keyboard accompaniments that could easily be by John Carpenter…one of the stand out tracks of the EP.” ‘Total Squaresville’ is the ninth release on Happy Robots Records.

Links

New Cinematic Ambient Album “Sonic Encounters Volume 01” @Bandcamp Exclusive #Ambient #CinematicAmbient #DarkAmbient #MusiqueConcrète #Synthesis

Sonic Encounters Volume 01 Album Cover B3

Sonic Encounters Volume 01 Now Available

The album contains 14 tracks and 2 hours of Cinematic Ambient Soundscapes. You can listen and buy here or from the embedded player below. I you like Krell music – you’ll love this album! If you enjoy the album consider a buy and please tell your friends.

About This Release

Sonic Encounters began as a podcast that ran from June 2015 through May 2016 and contained 13 episodes or original music racking up over 10,000 plays on just this series along. Each show had a companion post which contained original artwork made, a back story, behind-the-scenes artist notes and photos.

I’ve decided to convert the podcast into an album series. Sonic Encounters Volume 01 is the first release in the series. It contains all the past soundscape episodes. If you buy the full album you’ll get the bonus track “Tonalities from Orbit Live from the University of Colorado Atlas Institute Black Box”. This previously unreleased track is a 11:31 minute live room recording from the “Boulder Laptop Orchestra BLOrK performs with guest Mark Mosher” concert event.

Liner Notes

I converted the  podcast show notes to a single page of  liner notes here.

Premise & Buzz

“Goosebumps and Deep Breaths…I’m trying to restrain myself in writing this review as it’d be easy to come off sounding a bit hyperbolic… But these rich soundscape “stories” sincerely do thrill my senses.

The concept for Sonic Encounters (so far, and in my interpretation) is this. You read a short text (sometimes the title is enough) on the premise of the “story” before listening. Then you listen to a purely sonic piece of field recording morphed with music, electronic manipulation, and performance, and you’re immediately transported via your own imagination’s 3D projection of his premise.

Mark’s become a consummate sound artist. He creates powerful imagery and elicits surprisingly keen emotional response from the listener without being heavy-handed. His economy and value in precision is proof of his skill.

My favorite story so far is “Metamorphosis Under the Chatham Light”. I get chills just thinking about it.

My very close second is “And What Do Trees Hear When the Wind Blows”. Read each premise before you listen.  Or not. No matter, the pieces will creep into your consciousness and take up residence.”  – BlindFlyTheater.com 

New Brian Eno Album – Reflection

eno-relfection

Brian Eno’s new album Reflection is available in various formats at http://www.brian-eno.net/.

ALSO TO BE RELEASED AS DELUXE GENERATIVE VERSIONS FOR iOS AND APPLE TV

In linear form, the album is a single 54 minute track.

Brian Eno discusses Reflection

Reflection is the latest work in a long series. It started (as far as record releases are concerned) with Discreet Music in 1975 ( – or did it start with the first Fripp and Eno album in 1973? Or did it start with the first original piece of music I ever made, at Ipswich Art School in 1965 – recordings of a metal lampshade slowed down to half and quarter speed, all overlaid?)

Anyway, it’s the music that I later called ‘Ambient’. I don’t think I understand what that term stands for anymore – it seems to have swollen to accommodate some quite unexpected bedfellows – but I still use it to distinguish it from pieces of music that have fixed duration and rhythmically connected, locked together elements.

The pedigree of this piece includes Thursday Afternoon, Neroli (whose subtitle is Thinking Music IV) and LUX. I’ve made a lot of thinking music, but most of it I’ve kept for myself. Now I notice that people are using some of those earlier records in the way that I use them – as provocative spaces for thinking – so I feel more inclined to make them public.

Pieces like this have another name: they’re GENERATIVE. By that I mean they make themselves. My job as a composer is to set in place a group of sounds and phrases, and then some rules which decide what happens to them. I then set the whole system playing and see what it does, adjusting the sounds and the phrases and the rules until I get something I’m happy with. Because those rules are probabilistic ( – often taking the form ‘perform operation x, y percent of the time’) the piece unfolds differently every time it is activated. What you have here is a recording of one of those unfoldings.

Reflection is so called because I find it makes me think back. It makes me think things over. It seems to create a psychological space that encourages internal conversation. And external ones actually – people seem to enjoy it as the background to their conversations. When I make a piece like this most of my time is spent listening to it for long periods – sometimes several whole days – observing what it does to different situations, seeing how it makes me feel. I make my observations and then tweak the rules. Because everything in the pieces is probabilistic and because the probabilities pile up it can take a very long time to get an idea of all the variations that might occur in the piece. One rule might say ‘raise 1 out of every 100 notes by 5 semitones’ and another might say ‘raise one out of every 50 notes by 7 semitones’. If those two instructions are operating on the same data stream, sometimes – very rarely – they will both operate on the same note…so something like 1 in every 5000 notes will be raised by 12 semitones. You won’t know which of those 5000 notes it’s going to be. Since there are a lot of these types of operations going on together, on different but parallel data streams, the end result is a complex and unpredictable web.

Perhaps you can divide artists into two categories: farmers and cowboys. The farmers settle a piece of land and cultivate it carefully, finding more and more value in it. The cowboys look for new places and are excited by the sheer fact of discovery, and the freedom of being somewhere that not many people have been before. I used to think I was temperamentally more cowboy than farmer… but the fact that the series to which this piece belongs has been running now for over 4 decades makes me think that there’s quite a big bit of farmer in me.

About the generative versions

Brian Eno:

“REFLECTION is the most recent of my Ambient experiments and represents the most sophisticated of them so far. My original intention with Ambient music was to make endless music, music that would be there as long as you wanted it to be. I wanted also that this music would unfold differently all the time – ‘like sitting by a river’: it’s always the same river, but it’s always changing. But recordings – whether vinyl, cassette or CD – are limited in length, and replay identically each time you listen to them. So in the past I was limited to making the systems which make the music, but then recording 30 minutes or an hour and releasing that. REFLECTION in its album form – on vinyl or CD – is like this. But the app by which REFLECTION is produced is not restricted: it creates an endless and endlessly changing version of the piece of music.

The creation of a piece of music like this falls into three stages: the first is the selection of sonic materials and a musical mode – a constellation of musical relationships. These are then patterned and explored by a system of algorithms which vary and permutate the initial elements I feed into them, resulting in a constantly morphing stream (or river) of music. The third stage is listening. Once I have the system up and running I spend a long time – many days and weeks in fact – seeing what it does and fine-tuning the materials and sets of rules that run the algorithms. It’s a lot like gardening: you plant the seeds and then you keep tending to them until you get a garden you like.”

Peter Chilvers:

“Moving the composition into software allowed an extra opportunity ; the rules themselves could change with the time of day. The harmony is brighter in the morning, transitioning gradually over the afternoon to reach the original key by evening. As the early hours draw in, newly introduced conditions thin the notes out and slow everything down.”