Wireless Controllerism on Windows 10 with Microsoft’s Xbox One Wireless “S” Bluetooth Game Controller

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If you’ve been following along, you know I’ve been experimenting with the Microsoft Surface Pro 4 as a musical instrument platform for Live, Max for Live and virtual modular. I’ve also been working towards a completely wireless battery operated setup for a rapid setup rig for live improvisational work including wireless expressive controllers. Another advantage of wireless means you can use the same system on the couch without accidently snapping off a cable or stressing a port.

Controllerism with a Game Controller

I’ve been using wired joysticks on-and-off for a year or so. One interesting thing about using an Xbox (or PlayStation controller) as an expressive controller is that the design affordances are as well understood and obvious as the pedals of a car.

This means:

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Theremin and Synthesizer Halloween Concerts in Denver

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Halloween Shows

After nearly a year break from solo performances, I have two shows coming up this weekend with thereminist Victoria Lundy. If you are in Denver or will be coming through Denver stop by. Details below.

Teaser Video

To support these shows I’ve spent quite a bit of time re-working my live performance and collaboration rig and workflow to support real-time synthesis on both the sound/music side and the visuals side of things. I’ll do some posts on this soon. For now checkout a teaser video for the upcoming shows made from footage from October 12th Rocky Mountain Synthesizer Meetup on The Sound of 50’s SciFi: Theremins and Circuits.

Friday Oct 28th, 3-5pm: Denver Central Library Trick or Treat Street

We’ll be performing as part of the Denver Central Library Trick or Treat Street. We’ll have a real-time camera on the passerbys to add spooky effects to their image.

More info here – https://kids.denverlibrary.org/blog/halloween-trick-or-treat-street-central-library.

Here is a map. You can park on the street at 2 hour meters, or at the Civic Center parking facility located south of the DPL and just east of the Denver Art Museum.

Sunday Oct 30th, 7-10pm: Textures Ambient Showcase, Mutiny Information Cafe, Denver

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On the 30th we’ll be performing at Textures Ambient Showcase along with Winter Twig.Here is a map. Parking on the streets.

Listen to “Falling” Sound Design Experiment with Live 9 + Max for Live Convolution Reverb Pro Using IR Made with Pitch-to-MIDI Absynth Patch

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I was experimenting with Live 9’s new pitch-to-MIDI and Max for Live Convolution Reverb Pro a few days back and come up with this idea.

 

 

Here is the process I followed.

  1. I started with a vocal sample by the wonderful artist Snowflake (CC-BY-NC faccmixter.org/files/snowflake/37827). BTW I remixed one of her tracks last year – click here to give it a listen.
  2. Use “Convert Melody to New MIDI Track” to convert her Melody to MIDI. This creates a new MIDI track with an Ableton instrument.
  3. Swap the Ableton instrument on the MIDI track with Absynth 5.  You could of course stick with Ableton instruments here. I used a dissonant bell preset with major reverb decay.
  4. Create an audio clip from the Absynth patch. You could resample it or  freeze the track,  insert a new audio track and drag the frozen clip to the new audio track to create an audioclip.
  5. Insert the Max for Live Convolution Reverb Pro on the original vocal track.
  6. Apply the Absynth sample as the Impulse Response file for the Convolution Reverb by dragging the audio clip from step #4 and dropping it I on the waveform display of the Max for Live device.
  7. Play the original sample through the Convolution Reverb

What’s great about this process is since the Impulse Response was derived from pitch-to-MIDI of the original sample, the resultant reverb follows the phrasing of the original vocal track – but of course is also slewed and torqued in an organic way by using the Absynth patch with more sustain and bigger reverb and space. I also love how this creates new harmonics.

I also want to point out that while each of these discrete processes are available in separate tools already, having this all integrated in Live 9 with Max for Live makes for a rapid and creative sound design workflow. It’s taken me way longer to explain it her than id did to think this up and execute the idea (which only took about 5 minutes).

It’s also worth mentioning you don’t need to be a programmer to use Max for Live as an artist. Just drag in the devices that come with Max for Live essentials and use them like any native live device.

Links:

Mark Mosher
Synthesist, Composer, Performer
Boulder, CO
Artist Site & Album Downloads: www.markmoshermusic.com