Watch This Cool Tutorial on How to Make Pink Floyd “On The Run” with M4L OSCiLOTT Modular

 

I’ve had Max for Cats OSCiLOTT Max for Live Modular for some time but only recently had time to start digging into it. I’ve been poking around on YouTube watching tutorial videos on the instrument and bumped into this fantastic demo of how to make Pink Floyd’s “On the Run” in 10 Minutes. The demo also shows off how great OSCiLLOT sounds.

The video is by Gattobus (check out his YouTube channel here).

This is a tutorial I prepared for my students during the synth course in RockFactory music school in Siena (Italy) I used Ableton Live 9 with M4L plugin OSCiLLOT by Max for Cats. “On the run” is a classic piece of electronic music that I like very much to cover every now and then… so: here it is, again! 😛

You can use this tutorial to get an idea on how this piece is done and try to apply the basics to every kind of synthesizer you might have.

Sound Design Experiment with Aalto and AudioCubes

Watch embedded vide in HD

I decided to combine the fluid tangible spatial control of Percussa AudioCubes with the some droning patches I made from INIT with Madrona Labs wonderful Aalto synth.

Aalto has an awesome gate feature which allows you to create interesting drones leaving your hands free to modulate the hell out of parameters to create expressive and unique performances. You can also modulate the gate. Two AudioCubes in Sensor mode allow you to modulate with 8 MIDI CC’s with two hands.

AudioCubes Makes Virtual Synths Tangible

Watch the video above first with annotations on, then a second time with annotations off. On the second pass through watch how fluid the control is and how many parameters I’m managing at the same time. You’ll also see I’m getting visual feedback in the form of light intensity and color. After you perform with AudioCubes for a  while your brain starts to fool you into thinking that there are pressure bubbles around the sensors. In other words, even though the throw is about three inches when using your fingers with cubes, you can become quite accurate with control – especially when you combine visual feedback and audio feedback.

Because you can configure and map cube function differently with each patch, set and instrument, you start also thinking of each combination as an instrument on to itself. Once I set something like this up, I find myself coming back to it again and again getting a little better with the “instrument” with each use. This often results in me wanting to push things further and I learn the synth better plus creating more expressive performances.

Configuration Notes

I used the configure button on the Ableton Device holding the Aalto synthesizer select a set of parameters that I then map to faces of two Percussa AudioCubes in sensor mode. I did a video on the this Ableton mapping process a few years back with different devices, but the premise is the same. These cubes were configured via Percussa’s free MIDIBridge app.  I then use spatial movement of my fingers modulate parameters in Aalto. In same cases cubes modulate each other if sensors are facing each other.

Links

Mark Mosher
Electronic/Experimental Music Artist, Boulder, CO
Synthesist | Composer | Keyboardist | Performer

Synth Geek Blog: https://modulatethis.com/
Artist Site: www.MarkMosherMusic.com

New Album by Stretta – A Funneled Stone

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Stretta has released a new album called Funneled Stone on iTunes and on Bandcamp. Here is the description from the about page.

When I see a photo of a modular synthesizer, I wonder, as I believe many others do, what the thing sounds like. What possibilities lurk within this strange hardware? I want to hear something orchestrated and controlled. I want to hear someone commanding the instrument with authority, not merely floating on waves of serendipity. I want to hear something composed for the instrument, leveraging its strengths, not a orchestration of an existing composition.

'A Funneled Stone' is a pure modular synth release, tracked in the old-shool, 1970's way: one monophonic line at a time. Every sound you hear was created, patched and recorded for that moment in time. When a new sound is needed, the patch is torn down and a new one is built. Polyphony is achieved by tracking each voice individually.

A modular album is, by definition, unapologetically synthetic. I also tried to take a more minimalist approach to orchestration, so the individual sounds can be more fully isolated and appreciated. I spent much of the final month of production taking elements out, and editing for length. Sometimes this results in the remaining elements merely hinting at the underlying harmonic movement.

As you can imagine, this process is very time-consuming, but fun. I hope you enjoy the results as much as I enjoyed creating it.

I’m only a few tracks in but I’m really enjoying it so far.

Mark Mosher
Electronic Musician, Boulder, CO
www.MarkMosherMusic.com
www.ModulateThis.com